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Re: Amigurumi Basics: An Introductory Guide (Includes Pattern)

Posted: Sat Jun 02, 2012 6:29 am
by Laialda
Ally wrote:(I'm using huge ones to sew together small parts and it's...tricky!)


I'm sorry to hear they're causing a problem. :( There is one other option you can do if the yarn needles are giving you that much trouble, and is the just use regular embroidery floss/thread and a needle to sew them together. I often do this when making my dolls as the thread, when pulled tight, often vanishes into the yarn if you match up the colors well enough and, much like you said, it helps when working in a small space.

Re: Amigurumi Basics: An Introductory Guide (Includes Pattern)

Posted: Thu Aug 16, 2012 5:33 pm
by icedragonj
I was just wondering, is it still called Amigurumi if you knit instead of crotchet? I knitted up some small pokemon plushies recently, and I didn't even realise this was a thing. Might post some pics in the project forum if I get around to it.
Thanks!

Re: Amigurumi Basics: An Introductory Guide (Includes Pattern)

Posted: Sat Aug 18, 2012 7:44 pm
by Laialda
icedragonj wrote:I was just wondering, is it still called Amigurumi if you knit instead of crotchet? I knitted up some small pokemon plushies recently, and I didn't even realise this was a thing.


Actually, yes it is! The word amigurumi is Japanese (as you may have guessed) and translates as 'knitted/crocheted plush'. Since crochet tends to be the more versatile and popular of the two mediums, people often associate the word with only crochet plushies, but as far as technical terms go, it is used for both forms of weaving. :grin:

And yes, you should absolutely share your creations with the rest of us on the forums when you get a chance! :D

Re: Amigurumi Basics: An Introductory Guide (Includes Pattern)

Posted: Sat Aug 18, 2012 9:04 pm
by icedragonj
Thanks, I posted a pic under misc craft projects at http://www.spritestitch.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=5988 I hope you like them =)

Re: Amigurumi Basics: An Introductory Guide (Includes Pattern)

Posted: Fri Nov 09, 2012 4:14 pm
by Pyper
This looks really useful :) I have been thinking of branching into crochet, but none of the books I have were any use. They gave you how to do one stitch of each and then a mess of shorthand. I can do an individual stitch - what I couldnt work out was how to do more than one together :P This looks like I will be able to finally learn

Re: Amigurumi Basics: An Introductory Guide (Includes Patter

Posted: Wed Feb 13, 2013 3:27 pm
by QueenBex
Quickly commenting so I can find this later!

I'm learning! My biggest annoyance is how to hold the thread! I bet its going all twisty cos i'm holding it wrong!
Oh to give you some clue, I began 6 days ago. I have the slipknot down to a T now! But not much else :sorry:

Re: Amigurumi Basics: An Introductory Guide (Includes Patter

Posted: Thu Feb 14, 2013 2:09 am
by lcockitt
I usually wrap the thread once around my little finger, then loop it over my first finger. There are some good youtube tutorial videos showing how to hold the yarn and various stitches. I find it useful to see someone else doing a stitch and then trying it myself rather than trying to get the hang of it from pictures in books. I have a friend that tried to teach me to crochet, but I think she got a bit fed up when I kept asking her to show me the same stitch a few times as it wasn't sinking in - much easier to pause and rewind several times on youtube!

Re: Amigurumi Basics: An Introductory Guide (Includes Patter

Posted: Wed Mar 06, 2013 3:32 pm
by Laialda
QueenBex wrote:Quickly commenting so I can find this later!

I'm learning! My biggest annoyance is how to hold the thread! I bet its going all twisty cos i'm holding it wrong!
Oh to give you some clue, I began 6 days ago. I have the slipknot down to a T now! But not much else :sorry:


Yay for learning something new! I agree with lcockitt on watching how someone else crochets can be very helpful for a beginner. I...did not have that luxury and I often have 'purists' look down their nose at me for my "incorrect" yarn and hook holding methods. :rolls eyes: Personally, whenever I teach people I tell them to watch what other people do but to find what works best for YOU. It will always be difficult at the start as your hands are not used to holding these new positions for long periods of time so don't get discouraged if they hurt or cramp up until you get used to working those muscles. ;) I've never bothered making videos of myself working since so many video exist on youtube already, but if there was an interest I could possibly make one this summer during my only convention free downtime. DX

Re: Amigurumi Basics: An Introductory Guide (Includes Patter

Posted: Sun Apr 07, 2013 8:10 pm
by Pyper
I have just ventured into amigurumi and have one or two technique-type questions:

If I am making a ball, which way around do I hold it?

Crochet 1.jpg
Crochet 1.jpg (81.66 KiB) Viewed 8108 times
Or
Crochet 2.jpg
Crochet 2.jpg (80.07 KiB) Viewed 8108 times


When working my way around, do I hook from the front or back?

crochet 3.jpg
crochet 3.jpg (76.01 KiB) Viewed 8108 times
Or
crochet 4.jpg
crochet 4.jpg (77.53 KiB) Viewed 8108 times


I never thought about it until a pattern started saying through the front or back of the chain, and I realised I had no clue as to whether that meant the inner or outer side of the chain?

Re: Amigurumi Basics: An Introductory Guide (Includes Patter

Posted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 4:24 am
by Knittenkitten
To me, it looks like pictures 1 and 3 are the ways that you want to do it. You are still going to crochet your stitches the normal way (from front to back) but when it says to do your stitch through the front or back of the chain the pattern is talking about the loops at the top of each stitch. There is a "front" loop and a "back" loop. You will be making your loop through one of these loops instead of both of them.

Here is a pic from one of my pattern booklets. Hope it helps.

Resampled_2013-04-08_07-21-09_528.jpg
Resampled_2013-04-08_07-21-09_528.jpg (18.02 KiB) Viewed 8094 times


Oh and when I'm making a ball, I tend to stick the fingers of my other hand inside of it to help keep its shape and to hold the material better.